33% of Union Households Would Opt Out

NEFW

Are you for workers’ rights, but against union bosses and bullies?

Then grab some comeback cake, raise your Twinkie, and celebrate National Employee Freedom week! You may be asking, “What do Twinkies have to do with labor relations?”

Right-to-work laws in some states, which give employees the ability to opt out of compulsory union membership, could be crucial for the Hostess company’s comeback. The company went bankrupt last year, leaving many Americans nostalgic for the classic sugary snack cakes, after a standoff with its unionized workers. Thankfully, Twinkies are set to hit shelves again by July 15th thanks largely to non-union workers, bakeries located primarily in right-to-work states and their more efficient operating structure.

However, in many states, unions have used their political power to restrict a workers’ rights to opt out of membership. As a result of the union’s compulsory stranglehold on labor relations in both the public and private sectors, employees end up receiving harmful unintended consequences. In these states, employees  out on opportunities in jobs with many companies, like Hostess, when they decide to locate facilities outside of their borders. Additionally, union workers have no choice but to deduct a portion of their paycheck to support union policies that they may not agree with or are even antithetical to their political views.

Today ends a week of celebrating and bringing to light the ways employees across the nation can empower themselves to choose whether union membership is right for them.

When asked, “If it were possible to opt out of membership in a labor union without losing your job or any other penalty would you do it?” A national survey by the National Employee found that around 33% of union households would opt out of membership.

If you’re in that 33% percent with a union that isn’t serving you, acting against your own political interest, or you have a better way of spending your dues, visit http://employeefreedomweek.com/ and find the ways you, as a worker, can take back your right to choose.